Uganda

Uganda womenThe 20-year armed conflict in northern Uganda has left a complex and traumatic legacy, including a brutal culture of violence against women.  Many Ugandan women will face rape, domestic violence, and early and forced marriage in their lifetime.

Although strict legislation on violence against women has been passed, such as the 2010 Domestic Violence Act, women are still vulnerable as the laws have not been effectively implemented.

Knowledge of the 2010 Domestic Violence Act is poor and the police are often dismissive of cases of violence. The situation is exacerbated by widespread attitudes and beliefs that justify violence against women and girls.

Despite bearing the brunt of the conflict, women have also been sidelined in the peacebuilding process and decision-making. Even with international commitments adopted by Uganda to address women’s rights, progress has been unacceptably slow. There has been no political will to involve women in post-conflict recovery, which means their needs and concerns have not been addressed.

Women’s rights in Uganda

Supporting women in Uganda

We are working with two women’s rights organisations towards:

Making a difference

Last year our partners:

  • Trained 100 cultural and religious leaders on violence against women and raised awareness of the issue through drama productions
  • Reached 350 people in rural communities about the issue of violence against women, increasing the rate of referrals to the police and counselling services
  • Highlighted the gaps in women’s role in peacebuilding in the Peace, Recovery and Development Plan for Northern Uganda to the Prime Minister’s office. This was taken on board and now waiting approval by Parliament

Help raise more awareness about violence against women and girls across Africa, Asia and Latin America



Women’s voices

Ruth Ojiambo Ochieng: I would like the international community to believe in the women’s movement

Five Women, Five Voices: We've launched a series of films focusing on the root causes of violence against women and girls and the vital role of women's rights organisations

read more »

Netty Musanhu: The root cause of violence is inequality, it’s patriarchy, it’s socialisation

Five Women, Five Voices: We've launched a series of films focusing on the root causes of violence against women and girls and the vital role of women's rights organisations

read more »

View all voices